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Rubies for Valentine’s Day

Featuring George Balanchine’s Rubies
Jose Limon’s The Moor’s Pavane and
Mario Radacovsky’s Bolero

Rubies for Valentine’s Day; a dazzling collection of three remarkable ballets by world-renowned choreographers. The perfect date night for the romantic to come fall in love with dance. Opening night is on Valentine’s Day. “Rubies sends its dancers racing across the stage like lightning to Stravinsky’s jazz-inflected piano capriccio, emphasized by a sharp attack and sassy style.” – NYC Ballet

    • Dates

      Feb 14-16 &
      21-23, 2014

    • Price

      $40 – Adult
      $35 – Senior
      $30 – Child
      $20 – Student
      $12 – Student Rush

    Rubies

    George Balanchine

    Rubies is one of three parts of Jewels, an award-winning ballet created for New York City Ballet by co-founder and founding choreographer George Balanchine. It premiered on Thursday, April 13, 1967, at the New York State Theater with sets designed by Peter Harvey and lighting by Ronald Bates. Jewels has been called the first full-length abstract ballet. It can also be seen as three separate ballets, linked by their jewel-colored costumes. Balanchine commented: “The ballet had nothing to do with jewels. The dancers are just dressed like jewels.” Each of the three acts feature the music of a different composer: Emeralds is set to the music of Gabriel Fauré, Rubies to the music of Igor Stravinsky, and Diamonds to music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Rubies is one of three parts of Jewels, an award-winning ballet created for New York City Ballet by co-founder and founding choreographer George Balanchine. It premiered on Thursday, April 13, 1967, at the New York State Theater with sets designed by Peter Harvey and lighting by Ronald Bates. Jewels has been called the first full-length abstract ballet. It can also be seen as three separate ballets, linked by their jewel-colored costumes. Balanchine commented: “The ballet had nothing to do with jewels. The dancers are just dressed like jewels.” Each of the three acts feature the music of a different composer: Emeralds is set to the music of Gabriel Fauré, Rubies to the music of Igor Stravinsky, and Diamonds to music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

    Colleen Neary

    Stager

    The Moor’s Pavane

    José Limón

    “one of the greatest works of 20th century modern dance.”
    José Limón’s The Moor’s Pavane is based on the legend of Othello, the ill-fated Moor of Venice. The music is from several works by Henry Purcell and was arranged by Simon Sadoff, Limón’s Music Director. One of the great works of modern dance repertory of the 20th century, The Moor’s Pavane has been performed by many of the major classical ballet companies throughout the western world to glowing critical acclaim.

    Bolero

    “Radacovský has married the sensually combative cadence with the most refined mode of competition — chess. His ballet is a portrayal of black versus white, man versus woman contrasting in an onstage game.”
    The music of Boléro is a one-movement orchestral piece by Maurice Ravel (1875–1937). Originally composed as a ballet commissioned by Russian ballerina Ida Rubinstein, the piece, which premiered in 1928, is Ravel’s most famous musical composition. Radacovsky’s Bolero is his take on the famous music by Ravel.

    Bio

    Upon graduating from the Eva Jaczova Dance Conservatory, Radacovský joined the Ballet Company of the Slovak National Theatre in 1989. Soon after, he was promoted to principal dancer and performed principal roles in classical and contemporary pieces including Romeo and Juliet, Carmen, Giselle, La Dame Aux Camelias and more. He received acclaim for his ability to combine brilliant dancing technique with a natural acting talent and a masculine expression. Radacovský took first prize at the Czechoslovak Ballet Competition in 1990. In 1992, he was invited by Jiri Kilian’s to join Netherlands Dance Theatre.

    Mario Radacovsky

    Choreographer

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